Mechanical Engineering 

 Technical Writing (919111) ( 3 Cr.)

Course Description: This course develops the knowledge and skills to produce technical documents that meet professional and ethical standards required by technical fields and professions. It focuses on both the rhetorical and workplace problems that are addressed by writers, such as audience, exigency and purpose, and workplace constraints. Throughout the course, students will analyse and discuss recent areas of concern in the field technical communication, as well as produce documents in various technical genres, including proposals and formal reports. 

 

Scientific Thinking (190112)  ( 3 Cr.)

Course Description: The course emphasizes the unifying aspects of the scientific approach to the study of nature and human behavior. About one-third of the course is devoted to scientific inquiry and investigation. The course focuses on fact identification and concept formation and testing. In the remaining parts, the students are exposed to applications of the approach in various disciplines. The course sets some basic concepts and theories of science into broad historical, philosophical, and cultural context and traces the development of these theories to their present status. This serves the double purpose of acquainting students with the appropriate setting in which a given idea gained relevance and exposing them to the evolution toward the current methods of investigation. Moral and ethical issues in science are examined.

 

 Ethical Issues (910221) (3 cr.)

Course Description: Engineering ethics is an applied branch of philosophy, in which theoretical frameworks are utilized in order to appraise difficult moral situations and recommend action. Thus, engineering ethics, broadly construed, is a discipline which affects many individuals – not only engineers, but those who work with and rely on engineers, as well as the public at large. This course introduces the theory and the practice of engineering ethics using a multi-disciplinary and cross-cultural approach.

 

Entrepreneurship (803224) (3 cr.)

Course Description: This course introduces the students to the world of Entrepreneurship. This course aims to provide knowledge to the students towards the entrepreneurial activity and business ventures. This course will help the students to apply themselves in entrepreneurial activities by developing their own business plans and they can assess themselves by using the knowledge which they obtained during the course. It scrutinizes the subject from both the theoretical and practical insights whereby students are able to relate to the subject of entrepreneurship as applicable in their daily lives and more pertinently as applicable in the fast changing dynamic world of today. It also gives a focused practice oriented study where students can actively take part in developing the business plan. This course will help them to understand the various concepts and steps involved in the process of entrepreneurship.

 

Arab Society (304131)( 3 cr.)

Course Description: Description and analysis of social and cultural characteristics and problems of contemporary Arab Society, while taking into consideration the specific historical, economic, and ideological forces that shape it and the social basis for Arab unity and identity. Introduction to basic concepts and principles for understanding social phenomena.

 

World  History Art Survey (903233) ( 3 cr. )

Course Description: An introduction to the historical development of the visual arts in the western and selected non-western traditions from prehistoric beginnings until the late medieval periods, with emphasis on Islamic Art. Concepts such as formal analysis and cultural context will be explored through lectures, class discussions, and written exercises.

 

Modern and Contemporary Art ( 911331 ) (3 cr.)

Course Description: A survey of the development of style and content in twentieth-century painting and sculpture. The formal, conceptual, and expressive concerns of artists will be studied within their historical contexts. Formal and textual analysis will be practiced through written exercises.

 

Calculus I (101131) (3 cr.)

Course Description: Limits of one-variable functions, continuity and differentiability. Extrema and Curve sketching. Related rates. Linear approximation. Differentiation of Trigonometric functions. Applications of the derivative.

 

Fundamentals of Computer Science (201123) (3 cr.)

Course Description: Introduction to the discipline of computing. Computer systems, number systems, data representation and basic computer organization. Basic Math concepts, functions and propositional logic. Problem solving, abstraction, design and programming. Selection structures, repetition and loop statements. Modular programming. Basic testing and debugging of programs. Introduction to programming in C++. Professional Ethics for computer professionals.

 

Classical Mechanics, Sound and Heat (103113) (3 cr.)

Course Description: An introduction to classical mechanics covering vectors, applications of Newton’s laws, conservation laws and forces, motion in a plane, circular motion, equilibrium and elasticity, rotational motion, simple harmonic motion, energy and power; mechanical and sound waves, temperature, heat and the first law of thermodynamics.

 

 General Physics Laboratory (103114) (3 cr.)

Course Description: The fundamental quantities of physics are measured through selected experiments in mechanics, heat, and sound. Data are summarized, errors are estimated, and reports are presented.

 

Descriptive Geometry and Engineering Drawing (301116) (2 cr.)

Course Description: Introductory descriptive geometry. Orthographic and pictorial drawing. Sectional views, auxiliary views, and conventions. Dimensioning. Free hand sketching, and both manual and computer-aided drafting.

 

General Chemistry I (105115) (3 cr.)

Course Description: Chemical stoichiometry; atomic structure and periodicity; an overview of chemical bonding with a discussion of models and theories of covalent bonding; introduction to structure and chemistry of organic compounds.

 

Engineering Mechanics I - Statics (300123) (3 cr.)

Course Description: Fundamentals of mechanics. Equilibrium of practices, forces in space, equivalent systems, equilibrium of rigid bodies, distributed forces, center of gravity, internal actions, analysis of simple structures and machine parts. Friction. Moment of inertia.

 

Engineering Economy (300214) (3 cr.)

Course Description: Economic and cost concepts, the time value of money, single, multiple and series of cash flows, gradients, functional notation, nominal and effective interest rates, continuous compounding, rates of return. Computation and applications, economic feasibility of projects and worth of investments, comparison of alternatives. Replacement, deprecation and B.E. analysis. Introduction to risk analysis.

 

 

Calculus II (101111)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Definite and indefinite integrals.  The fundamental theorem of calculus and applications of the definite integral.  Area, arc length, volumes and surfaces of revolution. Differentiation and integration of Exponential, Logarithmic, Trigonometric and other Transcendental functions.  Techniques of integration.  Numerical integration.  Improper integrals.

 

Calculus III (101121)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Sequences and series (including power series).  Vectors and planes.  Surfaces.  Partial differentiation.  Introduction to double integrals (including double integrals in polar coordinates).

 

Differential Equations (101211)  (3 cr.)

Course description: First-order differential equations and applications.  Higher-order differential equations.  Applications of second-order linear differential equations with constant coefficients.  System of linear differential equations.  Series solutions.  Laplace transform.

 

Probability and Statistics (103222)  (3 cr.)

Course description: A course in probability and statistics designed for computer science and engineering students. Probability is used to construct parametric models that often arise in computer science and engineering problems. Statistics is then used to estimate the parameters of these models based on available data, check the adequacy of the fitted models, and test specific hypotheses. Topics include random variables and their probability distributions including uniform, binomial, geometric, Poisson, normal, and exponential distributions; expected value of functions of random variables; stochastic simulation; sampling distributions; maximum likelihood and least squares methods of estimation; statistical inference including hypothesis testing and interval estimation.

 

Electricity and Magnetism (103125)  (3 cr.)

Course description: An introduction to electricity and magnetism covering the electric field, Gauss’s law, electric potential, capacitance, dc circuits, magnetic fields, Faraday’s and Ampere’s laws, time-varying fields, Maxwell’ equations in integral form and alternating currents

 

General Physics Laboratory II (103126)  (3 cr.)

Course description: The fundamental quantities of physics are measured through selected experiments in electricity, magnetism, and light. Data are summarized, errors are estimated, and reports are presented.

 

Descriptive Geometry and Engineering Drawing (300116)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Introductory descriptive geometry. Orthographic and Pictorial drawing. Sectional views, Auxiliary views, and conventions. Dimensioning. Free hand sketching, and both manual and computer-aided drafting.

 

Scientific Thinking (190112)  (3 cr.)

Course description: The course emphasizes the unifying aspects of the scientific approach to the study of nature and human behavior. About one-third of the course is devoted to a discussion of the nature of scientific inquiry and investigation. The course focuses on the processes of fact identification and concept formation and testing. In the remaining part, the students are exposed to applications of the approach in various disciplines. The course sets some of the major basic concepts and theories of science into a broad historical, philosophical, and cultural context and traces the development of these theories and concepts to their present status. This serve the double purpose of acquainting the students with the appropriate setting in which a given idea gained relevance and exposing them to the evolution toward the current methods of investigation.

Philosophical Thinking (910315)  (3 cr.)

Course description: This course concerns the human desire to know. It is, therefore, a course in learning how to understand and how to be understood. It teaches students to listen to what the discipline of philosophy to develop students' ability to think critically. Critical thinking allows us to enter skillfully into a given point of view, absorb it sympathetically, decipher its connections with other ideas and positions, extract its consequences, and evaluate its strengths and weaknesses. This ability is developed through readings, discussions, and writing assignments that seek to enlarge student awareness of crucial matters of human existence, such as justice, obligation, and personal responsibility. Topics will be explored using "eminent texts", texts which have proven more durable than the spirit of any particular age, and which present contrasting perspectives thoughtfully and in depth.

 

Middle East History (903333)  (3 cr.)

Course description: This course presents the history of the Arab-speaking Middle East from pre-Islamic times to the modern era, with emphasis on the principal political, economic, social, religious, and cultural developments and their relevance to the contemporary Middle East. The course introduces students to historical methodology and different interpretive approaches. It attempts to foster a critical attitude toward sources and provides a context in which students can apply skills and concepts acquired in other hard-core courses.

 

Arab Society (903131)  (3 cr.)

Course description: The course is an introduction to understanding the Arab people. It describes and analyzes social and cultural characteristics and problems of contemporary Arab Society, taking into consideration the specific historical, economic, and ideological forces that shape it. Through the discussion of some selected readings reflecting different views the students will be trained to examine the Arab Society objectively.

 

Calculus I (101131)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Limits of one-variable functions, continuity and differentiation.  Extremist and Curve sketching.  Related rates.  Linear approximation.  Differentiation of Trigonometric functions.  Applications of the derivative.

 

Engineering mechanics I – Statics (300123)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Fundamentals of mechanics. Equilibrium of practices, forces in space, equivalent systems, equilibrium of rigid bodies, distributed forces, center of gravity, internal actions, analysis of simple structures and machine parts. Friction. Moment of inertia.

 

Engineering Mechanics II – Dynamics (300131)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Kinematics and kinetics of a particle, system of particles, and rigid bodies. Energy and momentum methods. Engineering applications.

 

Strength and Testing of Materials (300132)  (4 cr.)

Course description:  Concept of stress and strain in components, mechanical behavior of materials under tensile, compressive, and shear loads, hardness, impact loading, fracture and fatigue. Analysis of stresses and the corresponding deformations in components, axial loading, torsion, bending, and transverse loading. Statically indeterminate problems. Transformation of plane stresses, and Mohr’s circle.

 

Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics (300224)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Fluid properties, fluid statics, fluid flow. Conservation of mass and energy; continuity and Bernoulli’s Equations. Momentum principle and applications. Viscous effects of laminar and turbulent flow. Steady state closed conduit and open channel flow.

 

Engineering Analysis and Computation (300225)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Solution of sets of linear equations, roots of equations, curve fitting(interpolation), numerical integration and differentiation, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, boundary value problems and introduction to finite-difference methods. The course emphasizes engineering applications and the use of computer programs for problem solving. It includes a programming based project.

 

General Electrical Engineering (300232)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Electric Safety, Three-phase systems; Power calculations, Power Generation, transmission lines; Power distribution, electrical measurements; Installation in Residential Buildings, transformers; D.C. machines; synchronous machines, induction motors; switchgear and substation apparatus; Fire alarm and Fire Fighting systems.

 

Mechanical Engineering Drawing (307124)  (1 cr.)

Course description: This course covers the following topics in mechanical engineering drawing: Computer-Aided Drafting, mechanical details and assembly drawings, working drawings, geometrical tolerances, welding symbols and details, introduction to 3D modeling and introduction to civil and architectural drawings.

 

Mechanics of Materials (307215)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Internal reactions, load-stress relations and transformation of stresses for generally loaded rods. Generalized concepts of stress, strain and material relations. Energy methods. Elastic-plastic behavior of beams. Analysis of thin walled beams. Membrane theory of axisymmetric shells. Stress concentrations.

 

Engineering Materials (307216)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Introduction to materials. Crystal structure of solids. Construction and use of phase diagrams in materials systems. Relationship of crystal structure to properties of metallic materials and their applications. Heat treatment of steels. Types of polymers, ceramics, glasses, and semiconducting materials and their applications.

 

Mechanical Design I (307315)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Introduction to design concepts. Constructional details as affected by manufacturing, assembly, and strength considerations. Engineering materials. Design for steady and cyclic loading, and for rigidity and stability. Rigid and elastic connections. Bolts, rivets and welds. Design of shafts, springs and couplings. Use of interactive computer programs for problem solving is illustrated and encouraged. Design projects.

Fundamentals of Manufacturing Processes (307223)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Processing by casting, powder metallurgy, metal working, material removal, welding and joining. Processing of plastics and ceramics. Finishing processes. Materials recycling.

 

Fundamentals of Thermodynamics (307232)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Fundamental concepts and definitions, thermodynamic processes, pure substances and perfect gases, the first law of thermodynamics, the Second law of thermodynamics, the Carnot cycle, thermodynamic relations, and reversibility and entropy.

 

Quality and Process Control (307311)  (2 cr.)

Course description: Fundamentals of statistical quality control; control charts for variables and attributes; process capability analysis; sampling plans and techniques; introduction to quality assurance, quality management and ISO standards.

System Dynamics (307312)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Mathematical modeling of mechanical, electrical, and electromechanical systems.  Free and forced vibrations for single degree of freedom systems.  Free vibrations of multiple degree of freedom systems. State space and transfer function solutions.  Introduction to automatic control.

 

Engineering and Project Management (307313)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Modeling of projects, tasks and sub tasks as activity networks. Principles and practices of critical path methodology under conditions of certainty (CPM) and uncertainty (PERT). Resource loading and cost crashing concepts; project control, and extensive use of computer programs used in managing engineering projects.

 

Applied Fluid Mechanics (307314)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Dimensional analysis, fluid measurements, compressible flow, pipe network and water hammer, turbo machinery, pumps and turbines.

 

Applied Thermodynamics (307321)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Availability and second-law analysis.  Power cycles:  air standard and actual cycles; reversed cycles:  refrigerators and heat pumps, gas mixtures, psychrometry and air conditioning, hydrocarbon reactions, waste heat recovery.

 

Engineering Operations Research (307322)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Introduction to operations research, Linear Programming (LP) models; LP Solution approaches; Sensitivity Analysis of LP Models; Transportation and Transshipment Models, Assignment Problems. Maximal Flow, Shortest Route, Minimum Spanning Tree, and Integer Programming Applications. Case studies, Model Formulations and applications using computer software.                           

 

Work Analysis and Design (307323)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Methods used in determining the most effective utilization in human activity systems; work methods analysis and design; micro motion analysis; predetermined time systems; human and rating factors, work sampling; learning curves; physiological and psychological factors; computer aided time study.

 

Mechanical Design II (307416)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Design of machine elements used in power transmission: gears, bearings, roller chain drives and clutches.  Design for surface failure prevention.  Applications: automotive and machine too areas, etc.  Basics of systems design.  Design Projects.

 

Advanced Manufacturing Processes (307325)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Nontraditional manufacturing processes, such as laser welding and cutting, spark erosion and water jet machining. Automation of manufacturing processes. Numerically-controlled machine tools. NC programming. Economics of nontraditional and automated manufacturing.

 

 Facilities Planning (307412)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Process analysis; operation analysis, job design; facility location; facility layout; materials handling systems; storage and warehousing; office layout; design principles and analytical solution procedures; computerized approaches.

 

Selection of Materials and Processes for Engineering Design (307415)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Effect of material properties on design. Effect of manufacturing processes on design. Failure and reliability of components in service. Economics of materials and manufacturing processes. Decision making and the selection process. Integration of design and economic analysis with materials and process selection.  Case studies.

 

 Heat Transfer (307324) (4 cr.)

Course description: Steady and unsteady , one and multi-dimensional, heat conduction. Finite-difference and Finite-volume methods applied to heat conduction. Heat transfer by natural and forced convection. Heat transfer by radiation. Design of Heat exchangers.

 

Quality and Reliability Engineering (307421)

Prerequisites – 307311; Credit hours – 3

Course description: Quality in design, tolerance setting, national and international standards, selection and measurement of process quality parameters, quality audits and costs, establishment of quality assurance labs in service and manufacturing industries, calibration, life testing and failure analysis, basic concepts of system and component reliability and  quality engineering cases and applications.

 

 Manufacturing Systems Automation (307422)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Computer assisted manufacturing systems NC, CNC, DNC, robotics, material handling, group technology, flexible manufacturing systems, process planning and control.

 

Production and Inventory Control (307424)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Basic concepts of production management; forecasting; break-even analysis, aggregate production planning; inventory management; master scheduling, materials requirement planning; capacity planning; resource allocation and scheduling.

 

Industrial Training (307414) (1 cr.)

Course description: Each student is required to spend a minimum of eight weeks in industrial training in Egypt or abroad. A complete account of the experience is reported, presented, and evaluated.

 

Senior Project I (307419)  (3 cr.)

Course description: A capstone project. Topics are selected by groups of students according to their area of interest and the advisors' approval. Projects address solutions to open ended applications using an integrated engineering approach. Participants give an oral presentation of the main results achieved. After criticism and suggestions, they submit a written report.

 

Senior Project II (307429)  (3 cr.)

Course description: Participating students continue the work on the project topic selected in 307419. Participants give an oral presentation of the main results achieved. After criticism and suggestions, they submit a written report